Do You Know These Lesser-Known Car Facts?

Cars have become one of the fastest growing industries in the world. In a matter of years, this invention revolutionized the way we travel, connecting people from across the globe. We’ve put together a list of lesser-known car facts as a tribute to these mind-boggling machines.

highwayAccording to Autonet, the number of cars on the planted reached one billion in 2010. That means that one in every six people owns a set of wheels. In the US, more than 250 million cars are registered, which means that roughly 70% of citizens have their own car.

New car smell is derived from an array of chemical compounds found in the interior of your car. Emitting volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic materials create what many people have come to associate with freshness. Believe it or not, it has even been bottled as a fragrance.

How many parts are in your car? Try 30,000, including nuts and bolts. The transmission alone often has up to 1,000 individual parts.

It would take you roughly six months to reach the moon if you travelled at highway speeds the entire time. Think twice next time you complain about your morning commute.

The AutoTram Extra Grand is a German vehicle developed to carry 256 passengers. Consisting of four bus-length compartments wrangled together, this model is nearly 200 feet long.

Finally, the longest traffic jam lasted for 12 days in Beijing in 2010. Located on the road National Expressway 110, the string of cars was over 62 miles long.

Renault-Nissan Delivers Electric Vehicles for COP21 Climate Change Summit

zero emissionsFor an upcoming summit on climate change held in Paris, called the COP21 (Conference of Parties), Renault and Nissan have volunteered their services. Providing LEAF, ZOE, and e-NV200 electric and alternative fuel models as shuttles, the automakers give conference attendees the ability to get around while still being eco-friendly.

According to Nissan, over two hundred employees will promote Renault-Nissan’s leadership in electric vehicles at the COP21 Climate Change Summit in Paris. After completing a course on safe driving and EV technology, these employees are set to man 200 pure-electric vehicles.

“Helping negotiators get to their meetings, riding in quiet and smooth EVs that can be 100 percent recharged with renewable and extremely low-carbon electricity, sends a powerful message about our corporate commitment to the environment – and about our employees’ desire to be part of the solution to climate change,” said Marie-Francoise Damesin, Renault-Nissan’s global head of human resources.

Why is this important? Renault-Nissan seeks to demonstrate that electric and alternative energy are not radical ideas anymore. Electric vehicles can be practical, easy to use, and even fun. While areas like Paris have electric charge ports and electric rental vehicles, other countries have been slower to adopt such technologies.